Struct valence::ecs::prelude::World

pub struct World { /* private fields */ }
Expand description

Stores and exposes operations on entities, components, resources, and their associated metadata.

Each Entity has a set of components. Each component can have up to one instance of each component type. Entity components can be created, updated, removed, and queried using a given World.

For complex access patterns involving SystemParam, consider using SystemState.

To mutate different parts of the world simultaneously, use World::resource_scope or SystemState.

Resources

Worlds can also store Resources, which are unique instances of a given type that don’t belong to a specific Entity. There are also non send resources, which can only be accessed on the main thread. See Resource for usage.

Implementations§

§

impl World

pub fn register_system<M, S>(&mut self, system: S) -> SystemId
where S: IntoSystem<(), (), M> + 'static,

Registers a system and returns a SystemId so it can later be called by World::run_system.

It’s possible to register the same systems more than once, they’ll be stored separately.

This is different from adding systems to a Schedule, because the SystemId that is returned can be used anywhere in the World to run the associated system. This allows for running systems in a pushed-based fashion. Using a Schedule is still preferred for most cases due to its better performance and abillity to run non-conflicting systems simultaneously.

pub fn register_boxed_system( &mut self, system: Box<dyn System<Out = (), In = ()>> ) -> SystemId

Similar to Self::register_system, but allows passing in a BoxedSystem.

This is useful if the IntoSystem implementor has already been turned into a System trait object and put in a Box.

pub fn remove_system( &mut self, id: SystemId ) -> Result<RemovedSystem, RegisteredSystemError>

Removes a registered system and returns the system, if it exists. After removing a system, the SystemId becomes invalid and attempting to use it afterwards will result in errors. Re-adding the removed system will register it on a new SystemId.

If no system corresponds to the given SystemId, this method returns an error. Systems are also not allowed to remove themselves, this returns an error too.

pub fn run_system(&mut self, id: SystemId) -> Result<(), RegisteredSystemError>

Run stored systems by their SystemId. Before running a system, it must first be registered. The method World::register_system stores a given system and returns a SystemId. This is different from RunSystemOnce::run_system_once, because it keeps local state between calls and change detection works correctly.

Limitations
  • Stored systems cannot be chained: they can neither have an In nor return any values.
  • Stored systems cannot be recursive, they cannot call themselves through Commands::run_system.
  • Exclusive systems cannot be used.
Examples
#[derive(Resource, Default)]
struct Counter(u8);

fn increment(mut counter: Local<Counter>) {
   counter.0 += 1;
   println!("{}", counter.0);
}

let mut world = World::default();
let counter_one = world.register_system(increment);
let counter_two = world.register_system(increment);
world.run_system(counter_one); // -> 1
world.run_system(counter_one); // -> 2
world.run_system(counter_two); // -> 1

Change detection:

#[derive(Resource, Default)]
struct ChangeDetector;

let mut world = World::default();
world.init_resource::<ChangeDetector>();
let detector = world.register_system(|change_detector: ResMut<ChangeDetector>| {
    if change_detector.is_changed() {
        println!("Something happened!");
    } else {
        println!("Nothing happened.");
    }
});

// Resources are changed when they are first added
let _ = world.run_system(detector); // -> Something happened!
let _ = world.run_system(detector); // -> Nothing happened.
world.resource_mut::<ChangeDetector>().set_changed();
let _ = world.run_system(detector); // -> Something happened!
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impl World

pub fn new() -> World

Creates a new empty World.

Panics

If usize::MAX Worlds have been created. This guarantee allows System Parameters to safely uniquely identify a World, since its WorldId is unique

pub fn id(&self) -> WorldId

Retrieves this World’s unique ID

pub fn as_unsafe_world_cell(&mut self) -> UnsafeWorldCell<'_>

Creates a new UnsafeWorldCell view with complete read+write access.

pub fn as_unsafe_world_cell_readonly(&self) -> UnsafeWorldCell<'_>

Creates a new UnsafeWorldCell view with only read access to everything.

pub fn entities(&self) -> &Entities

Retrieves this world’s Entities collection.

pub unsafe fn entities_mut(&mut self) -> &mut Entities

Retrieves this world’s Entities collection mutably.

Safety

Mutable reference must not be used to put the Entities data in an invalid state for this World

pub fn archetypes(&self) -> &Archetypes

Retrieves this world’s Archetypes collection.

pub fn components(&self) -> &Components

Retrieves this world’s Components collection.

pub fn storages(&self) -> &Storages

Retrieves this world’s Storages collection.

pub fn bundles(&self) -> &Bundles

Retrieves this world’s Bundles collection.

pub fn removed_components(&self) -> &RemovedComponentEvents

Retrieves this world’s RemovedComponentEvents collection

pub fn cell(&mut self) -> WorldCell<'_>

Retrieves a WorldCell, which safely enables multiple mutable World accesses at the same time, provided those accesses do not conflict with each other.

pub fn init_component<T>(&mut self) -> ComponentId
where T: Component,

Initializes a new Component type and returns the ComponentId created for it.

pub fn init_component_with_descriptor( &mut self, descriptor: ComponentDescriptor ) -> ComponentId

Initializes a new Component type and returns the ComponentId created for it.

This method differs from World::init_component in that it uses a ComponentDescriptor to initialize the new component type instead of statically available type information. This enables the dynamic initialization of new component definitions at runtime for advanced use cases.

While the option to initialize a component from a descriptor is useful in type-erased contexts, the standard World::init_component function should always be used instead when type information is available at compile time.

pub fn component_id<T>(&self) -> Option<ComponentId>
where T: Component,

Returns the ComponentId of the given Component type T.

The returned ComponentId is specific to the World instance it was retrieved from and should not be used with another World instance.

Returns None if the Component type has not yet been initialized within the World using World::init_component.

use bevy_ecs::prelude::*;

let mut world = World::new();

#[derive(Component)]
struct ComponentA;

let component_a_id = world.init_component::<ComponentA>();

assert_eq!(component_a_id, world.component_id::<ComponentA>().unwrap())
See also

pub fn entity(&self, entity: Entity) -> EntityRef<'_>

Retrieves an EntityRef that exposes read-only operations for the given entity. This will panic if the entity does not exist. Use World::get_entity if you want to check for entity existence instead of implicitly panic-ing.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }).id();
let position = world.entity(entity).get::<Position>().unwrap();
assert_eq!(position.x, 0.0);

pub fn entity_mut(&mut self, entity: Entity) -> EntityWorldMut<'_>

Retrieves an EntityWorldMut that exposes read and write operations for the given entity. This will panic if the entity does not exist. Use World::get_entity_mut if you want to check for entity existence instead of implicitly panic-ing.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }).id();
let mut entity_mut = world.entity_mut(entity);
let mut position = entity_mut.get_mut::<Position>().unwrap();
position.x = 1.0;

pub fn many_entities<const N: usize>( &mut self, entities: [Entity; N] ) -> [EntityRef<'_>; N]

Gets an EntityRef for multiple entities at once.

Panics

If any entity does not exist in the world.

Examples
// Getting multiple entities.
let [entity1, entity2] = world.many_entities([id1, id2]);
// Trying to get a despawned entity will fail.
world.despawn(id2);
world.many_entities([id1, id2]);

pub fn many_entities_mut<const N: usize>( &mut self, entities: [Entity; N] ) -> [EntityMut<'_>; N]

Gets mutable access to multiple entities at once.

Panics

If any entities do not exist in the world, or if the same entity is specified multiple times.

Examples

Disjoint mutable access.

// Disjoint mutable access.
let [entity1, entity2] = world.many_entities_mut([id1, id2]);

Trying to access the same entity multiple times will fail.

world.many_entities_mut([id, id]);

pub fn inspect_entity(&self, entity: Entity) -> Vec<&ComponentInfo>

Returns the components of an Entity through ComponentInfo.

pub fn get_or_spawn(&mut self, entity: Entity) -> Option<EntityWorldMut<'_>>

Returns an EntityWorldMut for the given entity (if it exists) or spawns one if it doesn’t exist. This will return None if the entity exists with a different generation.

Note

Spawning a specific entity value is rarely the right choice. Most apps should favor World::spawn. This method should generally only be used for sharing entities across apps, and only when they have a scheme worked out to share an ID space (which doesn’t happen by default).

pub fn get_entity(&self, entity: Entity) -> Option<EntityRef<'_>>

Retrieves an EntityRef that exposes read-only operations for the given entity. Returns None if the entity does not exist. Instead of unwrapping the value returned from this function, prefer World::entity.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }).id();
let entity_ref = world.get_entity(entity).unwrap();
let position = entity_ref.get::<Position>().unwrap();
assert_eq!(position.x, 0.0);

pub fn get_many_entities<const N: usize>( &self, entities: [Entity; N] ) -> Result<[EntityRef<'_>; N], Entity>

Gets an EntityRef for multiple entities at once.

Errors

If any entity does not exist in the world.

Examples
// Getting multiple entities.
let [entity1, entity2] = world.get_many_entities([id1, id2]).unwrap();

// Trying to get a despawned entity will fail.
world.despawn(id2);
assert!(world.get_many_entities([id1, id2]).is_err());

pub fn iter_entities(&self) -> impl Iterator<Item = EntityRef<'_>>

Returns an Entity iterator of current entities.

This is useful in contexts where you only have read-only access to the World.

pub fn iter_entities_mut(&mut self) -> impl Iterator<Item = EntityMut<'_>>

Returns a mutable iterator over all entities in the World.

pub fn get_entity_mut(&mut self, entity: Entity) -> Option<EntityWorldMut<'_>>

Retrieves an EntityWorldMut that exposes read and write operations for the given entity. Returns None if the entity does not exist. Instead of unwrapping the value returned from this function, prefer World::entity_mut.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }).id();
let mut entity_mut = world.get_entity_mut(entity).unwrap();
let mut position = entity_mut.get_mut::<Position>().unwrap();
position.x = 1.0;

pub fn get_many_entities_mut<const N: usize>( &mut self, entities: [Entity; N] ) -> Result<[EntityMut<'_>; N], QueryEntityError>

Gets mutable access to multiple entities.

Errors

If any entities do not exist in the world, or if the same entity is specified multiple times.

Examples
// Disjoint mutable access.
let [entity1, entity2] = world.get_many_entities_mut([id1, id2]).unwrap();

// Trying to access the same entity multiple times will fail.
assert!(world.get_many_entities_mut([id1, id1]).is_err());

pub fn spawn_empty(&mut self) -> EntityWorldMut<'_>

Spawns a new Entity and returns a corresponding EntityWorldMut, which can be used to add components to the entity or retrieve its id.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}
#[derive(Component)]
struct Label(&'static str);
#[derive(Component)]
struct Num(u32);

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn_empty()
    .insert(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }) // add a single component
    .insert((Num(1), Label("hello"))) // add a bundle of components
    .id();

let position = world.entity(entity).get::<Position>().unwrap();
assert_eq!(position.x, 0.0);

pub fn spawn<B>(&mut self, bundle: B) -> EntityWorldMut<'_>
where B: Bundle,

Spawns a new Entity with a given Bundle of components and returns a corresponding EntityWorldMut, which can be used to add components to the entity or retrieve its id.

use bevy_ecs::{bundle::Bundle, component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

#[derive(Component)]
struct Velocity {
    x: f32,
    y: f32,
};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Name(&'static str);

#[derive(Bundle)]
struct PhysicsBundle {
    position: Position,
    velocity: Velocity,
}

let mut world = World::new();

// `spawn` can accept a single component:
world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 });
// It can also accept a tuple of components:
world.spawn((
    Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 },
    Velocity { x: 1.0, y: 1.0 },
));
// Or it can accept a pre-defined Bundle of components:
world.spawn(PhysicsBundle {
    position: Position { x: 2.0, y: 2.0 },
    velocity: Velocity { x: 0.0, y: 4.0 },
});

let entity = world
    // Tuples can also mix Bundles and Components
    .spawn((
        PhysicsBundle {
            position: Position { x: 2.0, y: 2.0 },
            velocity: Velocity { x: 0.0, y: 4.0 },
        },
        Name("Elaina Proctor"),
    ))
    // Calling id() will return the unique identifier for the spawned entity
    .id();
let position = world.entity(entity).get::<Position>().unwrap();
assert_eq!(position.x, 2.0);

pub fn spawn_batch<I>( &mut self, iter: I ) -> SpawnBatchIter<'_, <I as IntoIterator>::IntoIter>
where I: IntoIterator, <I as IntoIterator>::Item: Bundle,

Spawns a batch of entities with the same component Bundle type. Takes a given Bundle iterator and returns a corresponding Entity iterator. This is more efficient than spawning entities and adding components to them individually, but it is limited to spawning entities with the same Bundle type, whereas spawning individually is more flexible.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, entity::Entity, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Str(&'static str);
#[derive(Component)]
struct Num(u32);

let mut world = World::new();
let entities = world.spawn_batch(vec![
  (Str("a"), Num(0)), // the first entity
  (Str("b"), Num(1)), // the second entity
]).collect::<Vec<Entity>>();

assert_eq!(entities.len(), 2);

pub fn get<T>(&self, entity: Entity) -> Option<&T>
where T: Component,

Retrieves a reference to the given entity’s Component of the given type. Returns None if the entity does not have a Component of the given type.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }).id();
let position = world.get::<Position>(entity).unwrap();
assert_eq!(position.x, 0.0);

pub fn get_mut<T>(&mut self, entity: Entity) -> Option<Mut<'_, T>>
where T: Component,

Retrieves a mutable reference to the given entity’s Component of the given type. Returns None if the entity does not have a Component of the given type.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }).id();
let mut position = world.get_mut::<Position>(entity).unwrap();
position.x = 1.0;

pub fn despawn(&mut self, entity: Entity) -> bool

Despawns the given entity, if it exists. This will also remove all of the entity’s Components. Returns true if the entity is successfully despawned and false if the entity does not exist.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, world::World};

#[derive(Component)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entity = world.spawn(Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 }).id();
assert!(world.despawn(entity));
assert!(world.get_entity(entity).is_none());
assert!(world.get::<Position>(entity).is_none());

pub fn clear_trackers(&mut self)

Clears the internal component tracker state.

The world maintains some internal state about changed and removed components. This state is used by RemovedComponents to provide access to the entities that had a specific type of component removed since last tick.

The state is also used for change detection when accessing components and resources outside of a system, for example via World::get_mut() or World::get_resource_mut().

By clearing this internal state, the world “forgets” about those changes, allowing a new round of detection to be recorded.

When using bevy_ecs as part of the full Bevy engine, this method is added as a system to the main app, to run during Last, so you don’t need to call it manually. When using bevy_ecs as a separate standalone crate however, you need to call this manually.

// a whole new world
let mut world = World::new();

// you changed it
let entity = world.spawn(Transform::default()).id();

// change is detected
let transform = world.get_mut::<Transform>(entity).unwrap();
assert!(transform.is_changed());

// update the last change tick
world.clear_trackers();

// change is no longer detected
let transform = world.get_mut::<Transform>(entity).unwrap();
assert!(!transform.is_changed());

pub fn query<Q>(&mut self) -> QueryState<Q>
where Q: WorldQuery,

Returns QueryState for the given WorldQuery, which is used to efficiently run queries on the World by storing and reusing the QueryState.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, entity::Entity, world::World};

#[derive(Component, Debug, PartialEq)]
struct Position {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

#[derive(Component)]
struct Velocity {
  x: f32,
  y: f32,
}

let mut world = World::new();
let entities = world.spawn_batch(vec![
    (Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0}, Velocity { x: 1.0, y: 0.0 }),
    (Position { x: 0.0, y: 0.0}, Velocity { x: 0.0, y: 1.0 }),
]).collect::<Vec<Entity>>();

let mut query = world.query::<(&mut Position, &Velocity)>();
for (mut position, velocity) in query.iter_mut(&mut world) {
   position.x += velocity.x;
   position.y += velocity.y;
}

assert_eq!(world.get::<Position>(entities[0]).unwrap(), &Position { x: 1.0, y: 0.0 });
assert_eq!(world.get::<Position>(entities[1]).unwrap(), &Position { x: 0.0, y: 1.0 });

To iterate over entities in a deterministic order, sort the results of the query using the desired component as a key. Note that this requires fetching the whole result set from the query and allocation of a Vec to store it.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, entity::Entity, world::World};

#[derive(Component, PartialEq, Eq, PartialOrd, Ord, Debug)]
struct Order(i32);
#[derive(Component, PartialEq, Debug)]
struct Label(&'static str);

let mut world = World::new();
let a = world.spawn((Order(2), Label("second"))).id();
let b = world.spawn((Order(3), Label("third"))).id();
let c = world.spawn((Order(1), Label("first"))).id();
let mut entities = world.query::<(Entity, &Order, &Label)>()
    .iter(&world)
    .collect::<Vec<_>>();
// Sort the query results by their `Order` component before comparing
// to expected results. Query iteration order should not be relied on.
entities.sort_by_key(|e| e.1);
assert_eq!(entities, vec![
    (c, &Order(1), &Label("first")),
    (a, &Order(2), &Label("second")),
    (b, &Order(3), &Label("third")),
]);

pub fn query_filtered<Q, F>(&mut self) -> QueryState<Q, F>

Returns QueryState for the given filtered WorldQuery, which is used to efficiently run queries on the World by storing and reusing the QueryState.

use bevy_ecs::{component::Component, entity::Entity, world::World, query::With};

#[derive(Component)]
struct A;
#[derive(Component)]
struct B;

let mut world = World::new();
let e1 = world.spawn(A).id();
let e2 = world.spawn((A, B)).id();

let mut query = world.query_filtered::<Entity, With<B>>();
let matching_entities = query.iter(&world).collect::<Vec<Entity>>();

assert_eq!(matching_entities, vec![e2]);

pub fn removed<T>(&self) -> impl Iterator<Item = Entity>
where T: Component,

Returns an iterator of entities that had components of type T removed since the last call to World::clear_trackers.

pub fn removed_with_id( &self, component_id: ComponentId ) -> impl Iterator<Item = Entity>

Returns an iterator of entities that had components with the given component_id removed since the last call to World::clear_trackers.

pub fn init_resource<R>(&mut self) -> ComponentId
where R: Resource + FromWorld,

Initializes a new resource and returns the ComponentId created for it.

If the resource already exists, nothing happens.

The value given by the FromWorld::from_world method will be used. Note that any resource with the Default trait automatically implements FromWorld, and those default values will be here instead.

pub fn insert_resource<R>(&mut self, value: R)
where R: Resource,

Inserts a new resource with the given value.

Resources are “unique” data of a given type. If you insert a resource of a type that already exists, you will overwrite any existing data.

pub fn init_non_send_resource<R>(&mut self) -> ComponentId
where R: 'static + FromWorld,

Initializes a new non-send resource and returns the ComponentId created for it.

If the resource already exists, nothing happens.

The value given by the FromWorld::from_world method will be used. Note that any resource with the Default trait automatically implements FromWorld, and those default values will be here instead.

Panics

Panics if called from a thread other than the main thread.

pub fn insert_non_send_resource<R>(&mut self, value: R)
where R: 'static,

Inserts a new non-send resource with the given value.

NonSend resources cannot be sent across threads, and do not need the Send + Sync bounds. Systems with NonSend resources are always scheduled on the main thread.

Panics

If a value is already present, this function will panic if called from a different thread than where the original value was inserted from.

pub fn remove_resource<R>(&mut self) -> Option<R>
where R: Resource,

Removes the resource of a given type and returns it, if it exists. Otherwise returns None.

pub fn remove_non_send_resource<R>(&mut self) -> Option<R>
where R: 'static,

Removes a !Send resource from the world and returns it, if present.

NonSend resources cannot be sent across threads, and do not need the Send + Sync bounds. Systems with NonSend resources are always scheduled on the main thread.

Returns None if a value was not previously present.

Panics

If a value is present, this function will panic if called from a different thread than where the value was inserted from.

pub fn contains_resource<R>(&self) -> bool
where R: Resource,

Returns true if a resource of type R exists. Otherwise returns false.

pub fn contains_non_send<R>(&self) -> bool
where R: 'static,

Returns true if a resource of type R exists. Otherwise returns false.

pub fn is_resource_added<R>(&self) -> bool
where R: Resource,

Return’s true if a resource of type R exists and was added since the world’s last_change_tick. Otherwise, this return’s false.

This means that:

  • When called from an exclusive system, this will check for additions since the system last ran.
  • When called elsewhere, this will check for additions since the last time that World::clear_trackers was called.

pub fn is_resource_changed<R>(&self) -> bool
where R: Resource,

Return’s true if a resource of type R exists and was modified since the world’s last_change_tick. Otherwise, this return’s false.

This means that:

  • When called from an exclusive system, this will check for changes since the system last ran.
  • When called elsewhere, this will check for changes since the last time that World::clear_trackers was called.

pub fn resource<R>(&self) -> &R
where R: Resource,

Gets a reference to the resource of the given type

Panics

Panics if the resource does not exist. Use get_resource instead if you want to handle this case.

If you want to instead insert a value if the resource does not exist, use get_resource_or_insert_with.

pub fn resource_mut<R>(&mut self) -> Mut<'_, R>
where R: Resource,

Gets a mutable reference to the resource of the given type

Panics

Panics if the resource does not exist. Use get_resource_mut instead if you want to handle this case.

If you want to instead insert a value if the resource does not exist, use get_resource_or_insert_with.

pub fn get_resource<R>(&self) -> Option<&R>
where R: Resource,

Gets a reference to the resource of the given type if it exists

pub fn get_resource_mut<R>(&mut self) -> Option<Mut<'_, R>>
where R: Resource,

Gets a mutable reference to the resource of the given type if it exists

pub fn get_resource_or_insert_with<R>( &mut self, func: impl FnOnce() -> R ) -> Mut<'_, R>
where R: Resource,

Gets a mutable reference to the resource of type T if it exists, otherwise inserts the resource using the result of calling func.

pub fn non_send_resource<R>(&self) -> &R
where R: 'static,

Gets an immutable reference to the non-send resource of the given type, if it exists.

Panics

Panics if the resource does not exist. Use get_non_send_resource instead if you want to handle this case.

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn non_send_resource_mut<R>(&mut self) -> Mut<'_, R>
where R: 'static,

Gets a mutable reference to the non-send resource of the given type, if it exists.

Panics

Panics if the resource does not exist. Use get_non_send_resource_mut instead if you want to handle this case.

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn get_non_send_resource<R>(&self) -> Option<&R>
where R: 'static,

Gets a reference to the non-send resource of the given type, if it exists. Otherwise returns None.

Panics

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn get_non_send_resource_mut<R>(&mut self) -> Option<Mut<'_, R>>
where R: 'static,

Gets a mutable reference to the non-send resource of the given type, if it exists. Otherwise returns None.

Panics

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn insert_or_spawn_batch<I, B>( &mut self, iter: I ) -> Result<(), Vec<Entity>>
where I: IntoIterator, <I as IntoIterator>::IntoIter: Iterator<Item = (Entity, B)>, B: Bundle,

For a given batch of (Entity, Bundle) pairs, either spawns each Entity with the given bundle (if the entity does not exist), or inserts the Bundle (if the entity already exists). This is faster than doing equivalent operations one-by-one. Returns Ok if all entities were successfully inserted into or spawned. Otherwise it returns an Err with a list of entities that could not be spawned or inserted into. A “spawn or insert” operation can only fail if an Entity is passed in with an “invalid generation” that conflicts with an existing Entity.

Note

Spawning a specific entity value is rarely the right choice. Most apps should use World::spawn_batch. This method should generally only be used for sharing entities across apps, and only when they have a scheme worked out to share an ID space (which doesn’t happen by default).

use bevy_ecs::{entity::Entity, world::World, component::Component};
#[derive(Component)]
struct A(&'static str);
#[derive(Component, PartialEq, Debug)]
struct B(f32);

let mut world = World::new();
let e0 = world.spawn_empty().id();
let e1 = world.spawn_empty().id();
world.insert_or_spawn_batch(vec![
  (e0, (A("a"), B(0.0))), // the first entity
  (e1, (A("b"), B(1.0))), // the second entity
]);

assert_eq!(world.get::<B>(e0), Some(&B(0.0)));

pub fn resource_scope<R, U>( &mut self, f: impl FnOnce(&mut World, Mut<'_, R>) -> U ) -> U
where R: Resource,

Temporarily removes the requested resource from this World, runs custom user code, then re-adds the resource before returning.

This enables safe simultaneous mutable access to both a resource and the rest of the World. For more complex access patterns, consider using SystemState.

Example
use bevy_ecs::prelude::*;
#[derive(Resource)]
struct A(u32);
#[derive(Component)]
struct B(u32);
let mut world = World::new();
world.insert_resource(A(1));
let entity = world.spawn(B(1)).id();

world.resource_scope(|world, mut a: Mut<A>| {
    let b = world.get_mut::<B>(entity).unwrap();
    a.0 += b.0;
});
assert_eq!(world.get_resource::<A>().unwrap().0, 2);

pub fn send_event<E>(&mut self, event: E)
where E: Event,

Sends an Event.

pub fn send_event_default<E>(&mut self)
where E: Event + Default,

Sends the default value of the Event of type E.

pub fn send_event_batch<E>(&mut self, events: impl IntoIterator<Item = E>)
where E: Event,

Sends a batch of Events from an iterator.

pub unsafe fn insert_resource_by_id( &mut self, component_id: ComponentId, value: OwningPtr<'_> )

Inserts a new resource with the given value. Will replace the value if it already existed.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::insert_resource where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

Safety

The value referenced by value must be valid for the given ComponentId of this world.

pub unsafe fn insert_non_send_by_id( &mut self, component_id: ComponentId, value: OwningPtr<'_> )

Inserts a new !Send resource with the given value. Will replace the value if it already existed.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::insert_non_send_resource where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

Panics

If a value is already present, this function will panic if not called from the same thread that the original value was inserted from.

Safety

The value referenced by value must be valid for the given ComponentId of this world.

pub fn increment_change_tick(&self) -> Tick

Increments the world’s current change tick and returns the old value.

pub fn read_change_tick(&self) -> Tick

Reads the current change tick of this world.

If you have exclusive (&mut) access to the world, consider using change_tick(), which is more efficient since it does not require atomic synchronization.

pub fn change_tick(&mut self) -> Tick

Reads the current change tick of this world.

This does the same thing as read_change_tick(), only this method is more efficient since it does not require atomic synchronization.

pub fn last_change_tick(&self) -> Tick

When called from within an exclusive system (a System that takes &mut World as its first parameter), this method returns the Tick indicating the last time the exclusive system was run.

Otherwise, this returns the Tick indicating the last time that World::clear_trackers was called.

pub fn check_change_ticks(&mut self)

Iterates all component change ticks and clamps any older than MAX_CHANGE_AGE. This prevents overflow and thus prevents false positives.

Note: Does nothing if the World counter has not been incremented at least CHECK_TICK_THRESHOLD times since the previous pass.

pub fn clear_all(&mut self)

Runs both clear_entities and clear_resources, invalidating all Entity and resource fetches such as Res, ResMut

pub fn clear_entities(&mut self)

Despawns all entities in this World.

pub fn clear_resources(&mut self)

Clears all resources in this World.

Note: Any resource fetch to this World will fail unless they are re-initialized, including engine-internal resources that are only initialized on app/world construction.

This can easily cause systems expecting certain resources to immediately start panicking. Use with caution.

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impl World

pub fn get_resource_by_id(&self, component_id: ComponentId) -> Option<Ptr<'_>>

Gets a pointer to the resource with the id ComponentId if it exists. The returned pointer must not be used to modify the resource, and must not be dereferenced after the immutable borrow of the World ends.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::get_resource where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

pub fn get_resource_mut_by_id( &mut self, component_id: ComponentId ) -> Option<MutUntyped<'_>>

Gets a pointer to the resource with the id ComponentId if it exists. The returned pointer may be used to modify the resource, as long as the mutable borrow of the World is still valid.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::get_resource_mut where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

pub fn get_non_send_by_id(&self, component_id: ComponentId) -> Option<Ptr<'_>>

Gets a !Send resource to the resource with the id ComponentId if it exists. The returned pointer must not be used to modify the resource, and must not be dereferenced after the immutable borrow of the World ends.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::get_resource where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

Panics

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn get_non_send_mut_by_id( &mut self, component_id: ComponentId ) -> Option<MutUntyped<'_>>

Gets a !Send resource to the resource with the id ComponentId if it exists. The returned pointer may be used to modify the resource, as long as the mutable borrow of the World is still valid.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::get_resource_mut where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

Panics

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn remove_resource_by_id(&mut self, component_id: ComponentId) -> Option<()>

Removes the resource of a given type, if it exists. Otherwise returns None.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::remove_resource where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

pub fn remove_non_send_by_id(&mut self, component_id: ComponentId) -> Option<()>

Removes the resource of a given type, if it exists. Otherwise returns None.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::remove_resource where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

Panics

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn get_by_id( &self, entity: Entity, component_id: ComponentId ) -> Option<Ptr<'_>>

Retrieves an immutable untyped reference to the given entity’s Component of the given ComponentId. Returns None if the entity does not have a Component of the given type.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::get_mut where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

Panics

This function will panic if it isn’t called from the same thread that the resource was inserted from.

pub fn get_mut_by_id( &mut self, entity: Entity, component_id: ComponentId ) -> Option<MutUntyped<'_>>

Retrieves a mutable untyped reference to the given entity’s Component of the given ComponentId. Returns None if the entity does not have a Component of the given type.

You should prefer to use the typed API World::get_mut where possible and only use this in cases where the actual types are not known at compile time.

§

impl World

pub fn add_schedule(&mut self, schedule: Schedule)

Adds the specified Schedule to the world. The schedule can later be run by calling .run_schedule(label) or by directly accessing the Schedules resource.

The Schedules resource will be initialized if it does not already exist.

pub fn try_schedule_scope<R>( &mut self, label: impl ScheduleLabel, f: impl FnOnce(&mut World, &mut Schedule) -> R ) -> Result<R, TryRunScheduleError>

Temporarily removes the schedule associated with label from the world, runs user code, and finally re-adds the schedule. This returns a TryRunScheduleError if there is no schedule associated with label.

The Schedule is fetched from the Schedules resource of the world by its label, and system state is cached.

For simple cases where you just need to call the schedule once, consider using World::try_run_schedule instead. For other use cases, see the example on World::schedule_scope.

pub fn schedule_scope<R>( &mut self, label: impl ScheduleLabel, f: impl FnOnce(&mut World, &mut Schedule) -> R ) -> R

Temporarily removes the schedule associated with label from the world, runs user code, and finally re-adds the schedule.

The Schedule is fetched from the Schedules resource of the world by its label, and system state is cached.

Examples
// Run the schedule five times.
world.schedule_scope(MySchedule, |world, schedule| {
    for _ in 0..5 {
        schedule.run(world);
    }
});

For simple cases where you just need to call the schedule once, consider using World::run_schedule instead.

Panics

If the requested schedule does not exist.

pub fn try_run_schedule( &mut self, label: impl ScheduleLabel ) -> Result<(), TryRunScheduleError>

Attempts to run the Schedule associated with the label a single time, and returns a TryRunScheduleError if the schedule does not exist.

The Schedule is fetched from the Schedules resource of the world by its label, and system state is cached.

For simple testing use cases, call Schedule::run(&mut world) instead.

pub fn run_schedule(&mut self, label: impl ScheduleLabel)

Runs the Schedule associated with the label a single time.

The Schedule is fetched from the Schedules resource of the world by its label, and system state is cached.

For simple testing use cases, call Schedule::run(&mut world) instead.

Panics

If the requested schedule does not exist.

pub fn allow_ambiguous_component<T>(&mut self)
where T: Component,

Ignore system order ambiguities caused by conflicts on Components of type T.

pub fn allow_ambiguous_resource<T>(&mut self)
where T: Resource,

Ignore system order ambiguities caused by conflicts on Resources of type T.

Trait Implementations§

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impl Debug for World

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fn fmt(&self, f: &mut Formatter<'_>) -> Result<(), Error>

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more
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impl Default for World

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fn default() -> World

Returns the “default value” for a type. Read more
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impl RunSystemOnce for &mut World

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fn run_system_once_with<T, In, Out, Marker>(self, input: In, system: T) -> Out
where T: IntoSystem<In, Out, Marker>,

Runs a system with given input and applies its deferred parameters.
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fn run_system_once<T, Out, Marker>(self, system: T) -> Out
where T: IntoSystem<(), Out, Marker>,

Runs a system and applies its deferred parameters.
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impl SystemParam for &World

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type State = ()

Used to store data which persists across invocations of a system.
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type Item<'w, 's> = &'w World

The item type returned when constructing this system param. The value of this associated type should be Self, instantiated with new lifetimes. Read more
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fn init_state( _world: &mut World, system_meta: &mut SystemMeta ) -> <&World as SystemParam>::State

Registers any World access used by this SystemParam and creates a new instance of this param’s State.
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unsafe fn get_param<'w, 's>( _state: &'s mut <&World as SystemParam>::State, _system_meta: &SystemMeta, world: UnsafeWorldCell<'w>, _change_tick: Tick ) -> <&World as SystemParam>::Item<'w, 's>

Creates a parameter to be passed into a SystemParamFunction. Read more
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fn new_archetype( _state: &mut Self::State, _archetype: &Archetype, _system_meta: &mut SystemMeta )

For the specified Archetype, registers the components accessed by this SystemParam (if applicable).
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fn apply(state: &mut Self::State, system_meta: &SystemMeta, world: &mut World)

Applies any deferred mutations stored in this SystemParam’s state. This is used to apply Commands during apply_deferred.
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impl<'w> ReadOnlySystemParam for &'w World

SAFETY: only reads world

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impl Send for World

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impl Sync for World

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fn from(t: T) -> T

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impl<T> FromWorld for T
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fn from_world(_world: &mut World) -> T

Creates Self using data from the given World.
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